Posts tagged ‘chef’

January 21, 2013

Recipe: Stevie Parle’s Moroccan Chickpea Stew with Fried Egg Brik and Cucumber Salad

Well, this recipe from the Observer Food Monthly magazine has ETP drooling somewhat. It’s a north African spiced chickpea dish that should be quite dry as there’s only one tomato used to add ‘sauce’ rather than a tin of them. But the novelty value, for us at least, is the filo and egg ‘brik’, which will add extra protein to the dish… as well as steering it well away from sounding healthy! Maybe that’s where the cucumber accompaniment comes in. Too late, cucumber, too late.

In any case, as chef Parle says, it’s a concoction of some favourite things thrown together and yep, we’ll be making it. The recipe is here.

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April 10, 2012

Last night’s dinner: Denis Cotter’s roast garlic and fennel mash with lemon-braised chickpeas and aubergine

Wow. Denis Cotter claims this is an autumnal dish. We had it on a dark April day when a bowl of filling, warming loveliness was called for. The garlic and fennel mash was sublime and a tangy topping of chickpeas was the perfect complement. We made a little too much and still scraped our bowls clean. The recipe is in Cotter’s book For the Love of Food, here. I know we plug this book intermittently, but it’s with good reason. So, no recipe here – go buy!

March 29, 2012

Last Night’s Dinner: Tomato salad with basil and goat’s cheese

A starter that doesn’t really look like the recipe title suggests. Yes, it’s a bit ‘dinner party’ isn’t it? It’s also a refreshing ‘palate cleanser’ of a starter, perfect for the end of a warm spring or summer day. (If it had been a little warmer we’d have uncorked a bottle of pink.)

The recipe is based on one in Simon Hopkinson’s The Vegetarian Option. The book is great for sides, starters, flans and such, but not so good on whole vegetarian meals, which is something of a shame. Have a look here. Hopkinson makes a tomato jelly, which would be great, but I chanced it with something simpler – a tomato salad – mainly because I couldn’t find any vegetarian gelatine in the local supermarket.

For the tomato salad I quartered and deseeded some cherry tomatoes, finely chopped a small amount of red onion, mixed them both with a splash of red wine vinegar, a little olive oil, salt and pepper, and a tiny amount of fresh red chilli, and set aside.

For the goat’s cheese you need a soft, creamy goat’s cheese with no rind. In a small bowl mix it with a spoonful of creme fraiche, soured cream or even plain yoghurt, season with a little pepper, stir in a little olive oil and mix t get a slightly softer, creamier ‘cheese’ that can be spooned easily into a glass. Chop some fresh basil very finely and mix into the cheese mixture.

Layer the cheese into a glass, carefully place some tomato salad on top and garnish with a slice of cucumber.

Quantities will vary, obviously, depending on how many portions you’re making, the size of glass, the size of tomatoes etc. I think a smallish portion works best, but not so small as an amuse bouche. Any variations? Let us know.

January 16, 2012

Recipe: Smoked garlic soup with parsley pesto

We received a gift of some smoked garlic at Christmas – from the rather famous Garlic Farm on the Isle of Wight. It’s been ages since we’ve had any smoked garlic and quite frankly I couldn’t remember what we’d done with it in the past other that, well, enjoy it. For some reason I though a soup must be something in which its aromatic properties would hit the right note and, after a little internet search, I found this recipe here, from Gino D’Acampo, which is what we’ll be eating tomorrow evening.

December 7, 2011

Recipe: Angela Hartnett’s wild mushrooms and fried egg on toast

We know Angela Hartnett can do posh nosh, but it’s rather nice when she does cheap and cheerful too. Good ingredients are probably key with her breakfast/brunch/snack/litebite plate of mushrooms, eggs and bread. And there’s nothing exceptional about her recipe, published in the Guardian newspaper today… except that it makes me want to eat it. Now.

It’s here.

October 3, 2011

Last Night’s Dinner: Spiced halloumi with a warm Puy lentil, spinach and beetroot salad

Warm salads are the perfect choice for months when the seasons are changing. Maybe it’s the ability to take some veg from one season and lighten it up, or load it down, with some from the next.

This salad – I say salad, though it’s almost a stew, is a Denis Cotter recipe from For the Love of Food – a book we’ve used a few times in this blog. See it here, it’s great. Oh, and go and visit Denis’s restaurant in Cork – it won’t let you down. Have a look, here.

So, I won’t give the recipe in full but, basically… the slices of halloumi are marinated briefly in chillis, cumin and lime zest; the beetroot roasted, with a sprinkle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar; the lentils cooked with sprigs of thyme and garlic; serve with lentils on a bed of spinach with the halloumi on top.

And can you spot our variation? Yep, we had no spinach so we steamed some greens and ran them through the lentils. Twas fine indeed.

August 31, 2011

Recipe: Bill Granger’s flatbread with red onion and chard

We have got some chard in the kitchen at the moment so will probably be tempted to make this light supper. The prospect of making your own flatbread is always rather exciting and, given that it doesn’t need to rise very much (although it does use yeast and need to prove), it’s rather more fail-safe than proper, full-on, up-to-the-elbows-in-flour bread making.

I haven’t kept up to date with the style of food Australian chef and restaurateur Bill Granger makes. I interviewed him once, by email, and he sent back a well-written, considered and quite passionate response to the questions, so he’s remained in ETP’s ‘good books’ since. But back then his big thing was luscious Aussie-American breakfasts at his waterfront cafe – this recipe is distinctly more European.

The recipe is from the Independent, here.

March 8, 2011

Tom Aikens exclusive recipe

Sometimes the ‘work’ inbox here at Earth To Plate fills up with press releases from all kinds of things we’re not expecting. Today, for example, we’ve had (among many) an invite to a ‘Street Art’ gallery show opening, information about palm oil, an invitation to take tea at the German Historical Institute in Lower Saxony, and a press release regarding a ‘revolutionary new skin care system called SQOOM’.

We also received an exclusive recipe from Stilton cheesemakers Clawson and Michelin-starred chef Tom Aikens – for Broccoli and Blue Stilton Soup. It seems the collaboration between Aikens and Clawson comes in celebration of the cheesemaker’s centenary year. In fact, Long Clawson Dairy has created a recipe book, ‘Cooking Creatively with Cheese’ in collaboration with the star chef. The book takes you through the decades of the dairy’s history, starting from the 1910s – from which this recipe is selected. The book is available to buy on Amazon priced at £7.95.

Anyway, we thought we’d share the recipe with you (because we’re here to cook and eat, not to plug products!) We have some broccoli in the cupboard, so maybe we’ll give this a go later in the week. Watch this space!

TOM AIKENS AND LONG CLAWSON BROCCOLI AND BLUE STILTON SOUP

(Serves 4 as a starter)

400g broccoli florets and stalks cut into small pieces

500ml white chicken stock or water simmering

50g butter

1 onion thinly sliced

6 spring onions thinly sliced

4 cloves garlic finely chopped

100g Blue Stilton

100ml double cream

2g salt

12 turns of freshly ground black pepper

1 pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Extra Stilton for the garnish

METHOD

Place a medium pan onto a low to medium heat, then add the onion and garlic, salt, nutmeg and pepper with the butter, cover with a lid and cook slowly so they sweat in the steam until they soften.

This will take approximately 5 minutes, then add the pieces of broccoli and spring onions, cover with a lid again and cook for a further 3-4 minutes, then pour over the hot stock.

Cover with a lid and bring to the simmer, then remove the lid. Add the cream and cook for five minutes until the broccoli is tender. Add the Stilton and then place into a blender and puree coarsely. Serve straight away, placing some extra pieces of cheese into the soup.